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Hans Christian Andersen Quotes

70 of the best book quotes from Hans Christian Andersen
  1. #1
    ″‘Oh,’ said the mother, ‘that is not a turkey; how well he uses his legs, and how upright he holds himself! He is my own child, and he is not so very ugly after all if you look at him properly.‘”
  2. #2
    ″‘Oh,’ sighed the duckling, ‘how thankful I am for being so ugly; even a dog will not bite me.’ And so he lay quite still, while the shot rattled through the rushes, and gun after gun was fired over him.”
  3. #3
    “Early in the morning, a peasant, who was passing by, saw what had happened. He broke the ice in pieces with his wooden shoe, and carried the duckling home to his wife.”
  4. #4
    ″‘No, I declare, the largest egg lies there still. I wonder how long this is to last, I am quite tired of it;’ and she seated herself again on the nest.”
  5. #5
    “The winter grew colder and colder; he was obliged to swim about on the water to keep it from freezing, but every night the space on which he swam became smaller and smaller. At length it froze so hard that the ice in the water crackled as he moved, and the duckling had to paddle with his legs as well as he could, to keep the space from closing up. He became exhausted at last, and lay still and helpless, frozen fast in the ice.”
  6. #6
    “He now felt glad at having suffered sorrow and trouble, because it enabled him to enjoy so much better all the pleasure and happiness around him; for the great swans swam round the new-comer, and stroked his neck with their beaks, as a welcome.”
  7. #7
    “The poor little duckling did not know where to turn. How he grieved over his own ugliness, and how sad he was! The poor creature was mocked and laughed at by the whole henyard.”
  8. #8
    ″‘Oh,’ said the mother, ‘that is not a turkey; how well he uses his legs, and how upright he holds himself! He is my own child, and he is not so very ugly after all if you look at him properly.‘”
  9. #9
    ″‘Oh,’ said the mother, ‘that is not a turkey; how well he uses his legs, and how upright he holds himself! He is my own child, and he is not so very ugly after all if you look at him properly.‘”
  10. #10
    “At last the large egg broke, and a young one crept forth crying, ‘Peep, peep.’ It was very large and ugly.”
  1. #11
    ″‘I believe I must go out into the world again,’ said the duckling.”
  2. #12
    ″‘I will fly to those royal birds,’ he exclaimed, ‘and they will kill me, because I am so ugly, and dare to approach them; but it does not matter: better be killed by them than pecked by the ducks, beaten by the hens, pushed about by the maiden who feeds the poultry, or starved with hunger in the winter.‘”
  3. #13
    ″‘The new one is the most beautiful of all; he is so young and pretty.’ And the old swans bowed their heads before him.”
  4. #14
    “The ducks pecked him, the chickens beat him, and the girl who fed the poultry kicked him with her feet. So at last he ran away, frightening the little birds in the hedge as he flew over the palings.”
  5. #15
    “Poor ugly creature, how gladly he would have lived even with the ducks had they only given him encouragement.”
  6. #16
    “It would be very sad, were I to relate all the misery and privations which the poor little duckling endured during the hard winter;”
  7. #17
    “But what did he see in the clear stream below? His own image; no longer a dark, gray bird, ugly and disagreeable to look at, but a graceful and beautiful swan.”
  8. #18
    ″‘You don’t understand me,’ said the duckling.
    ‘We don’t understand you? Who can understand you, I wonder?‘”
  9. #19
    ″‘Can you raise your back, or purr, or throw out sparks?’ said the tom cat.

    ‘No.’
    ‘Then you have no right to express an opinion when sensible people are speaking.‘”
  10. #20
    ″‘I never dreamed of such happiness as this, while I was an ugly duckling.‘”

Books by Hans Christian Andersen

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Little Mermaid book
Bernadette Watts, Hans Christian Andersen
Picture book
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The Snow Queen book
Hans Christian Andersen, Bernadette Watts
Picture book
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Andersen’s Fairy Tales book
Hans Christian Andersen, Lisbeth Zwerger
Picture book
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An Illustrated Treasury of Hans Christian Andersen's Fairy Tales book
Hans Christian Andersen, Anastasiya Archipova
Picture book
3.8
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Thumbelina book
Hans Christian Andersen, Elsa Beskow
Picture book
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The Princess and the Pea book
Linda Olafsdottir, Diane Namm, Hans Christian Andersen
Picture book
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The Little Match Girl book
Hans Christian Andersen, Rachel Isadora
Picture book
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  1. #21
    The first thing in the world they ever heard were the words, “Tin soldiers!” uttered by a little boy, who clapped his hands with delight when the lid of the box, in which they lay, was taken off.
  2. #22
    The soldiers were all exactly alike, excepting one, who had only one leg; he had been left to the last, and then there was not enough of the melted tin to finish him, so they made him to stand firmly on one leg, and this caused him to be very remarkable.
  3. #23
    All this was very pretty, but the prettiest of all was a tiny little lady, who stood at the open door of the castle; she, also, was made of paper, and she wore a dress of clear muslin, with a narrow blue ribbon over her shoulders just like a scarf.
  4. #24
    “That is the wife for me,” he thought; “but she is too grand, and lives in a castle, while I have only a box to live in, five-and-twenty of us altogether, that is no place for her. Still I must try and make her acquaintance.”
  5. #25
    When evening came, the other tin soldiers were all placed in the box, and the people of the house went to bed. Then the playthings began to have their own games together, to pay visits, to have sham fights, and to give balls.
  6. #26
    [I]t was almost as cold at home as here, for they had only the roof to cover them, through which the wind howled, although the largest holes had been stopped up with straw and rags.
  7. #27
    She rubbed another match on the wall. It burst into a flame, and where its light fell upon the wall it became as transparent as a veil, and she could see into the room. The table was covered with a snowy white table-cloth, on which stood a splendid dinner service, and a steaming roast goose, stuffed with apples and dried plums. And what was still more wonderful, the goose jumped down from the dish and waddled across the floor, with a knife and fork in its breast, to the little girl. Then the match went out, and there remained nothing but the thick, damp, cold wall before her.
  8. #28
    Far down in the forest, where the warm sun and the fresh air made a sweet resting-place, grew a pretty little fir-tree; and yet it was not happy, it wished so much to be tall like its companions— the pines and firs which grew around it.
  9. #29
    Still, as it grew, it complained, “Oh! how I wish I were as tall as the other trees, then I would spread out my branches on every side, and my top would over-look the wide world. I should have the birds building their nests on my boughs, and when the wind blew, I should bow with stately dignity like my tall companions.”
  10. #30
    They were all anxious to see this wonderful soldier who had travelled about inside a fish; but he was not at all proud.
  1. #31
    They placed him on the table, and—how many curious things do happen in the world!—there he was in the very same room from the window of which he had fallen, there were the same children, the same playthings, standing on the table, and the pretty castle with the elegant little dancer at the door . . .
  2. #32
    She lighted another match, and then she found herself sitting under a beautiful Christmas-tree. . . . Thousands of tapers were burning upon the green branches, and colored pictures, like those she had seen in the show-windows, looked down upon it all. The little one stretched out her hand towards them, and the match went out.
  3. #33
    It touched the tin soldier so much to see her that he almost wept tin tears, but he kept them back.
  4. #34
    Presently one of the little boys took up the tin soldier, and threw him into the stove. . . . The flames lighted up the tin soldier, as he stood, the heat was very terrible, but whether it proceeded from the real fire or from the fire of love he could not tell.
  5. #35
    He looked at the little lady, and she looked at him. He felt himself melting away, but he still remained firm with his gun on his shoulder.
  6. #36
    She had drawn her little feet under her, but she could not keep off the cold; and she dared not go home, for she had sold no matches, and could not take home even a penny of money.
  7. #37
    Then she saw a star fall, leaving behind it a bright streak of fire. “Someone is dying,” thought the little girl, for her old grandmother, the only one who had ever loved her, and who was now dead, had told her that when a star falls, a soul was going up to God.
  8. #38
    In the dawn of morning there lay the poor little one, with pale cheeks and smiling mouth, leaning against the wall; she had been frozen to death on the last evening of the year . . . No one imagined what beautiful things she had seen, nor into what glory she had entered with her grandmother, on New-year’s day.
  9. #39
    “But a mermaid has no tears, and therefore she suffers so much more.”
  10. #40
    “Just living is not enough,” said the butterfly, “one must have sunshine, freedom, and a little flower.”

Books about winter

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Snowmen at Christmas book
Picture book
6.4
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Sleepover with Beatrice & Bear book
Picture book
5.8
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How to Build a Snow Bear book
Picture book
5.8
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Tacky the Penguin book
Board book
5.8
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Tap the Magic Tree book
Board book
5.6
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Claudia & Moth book
Picture book
5.6
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The Snowman Shuffle book
Board book
5.5
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Bear Is Not Tired book
Picture book
5.5
Add to list
  1. #41
    The pieces were placed in a fire under the copper, and they quickly blazed up brightly, while the tree sighed so deeply that each sigh was like a pistol-shot. Then the children, who were at play, came and seated themselves in front of the fire, and looked at it and cried, “Pop, pop.” But at each “pop,” which was a deep sigh, the tree was thinking of a summer day in the forest; and of Christmas evening, and of “Humpty Dumpty,” the only story it had ever heard or knew how to relate, till at last it was consumed.
  2. #42
    “Where words fail, music speaks.”
  3. #43
    “When the bird of the heart begins to sing, too often will Reason stop up her ears.”
  4. #44
    Suddenly the door of the room flew open and the draught of air caught up the little dancer, she fluttered like a sylph right into the stove by the side of the tin soldier, and was instantly in flames and was gone. . . . [T]he next morning, when the maid servant took the ashes out of the stove, she found him in the shape of a little tin heart.
  5. #45
    In the cold and the darkness, a poor little girl, with bare head and naked feet, roamed through the streets.
  6. #46
    So the little girl went on with her little naked feet, which were quite red and blue with the cold. In an old apron she carried a number of matches, and had a bundle of them in her hands. No one had bought anything of her the whole day, nor had anyone given her even a penny. Shivering with cold and hunger, she crept along; poor little child, she looked the picture of misery. The snowflakes fell on her long, fair hair, which hung in curls on her shoulders, but she regarded them not.
  7. #47
    Her little hands were almost frozen with the cold. Ah! perhaps a burning match might be some good, if she could draw it from the bundle and strike it against the wall, just to warm her fingers. She drew one out—“scratch!” how it sputtered as it burnt! It gave a warm, bright light, like a little candle, as she held her hand over it. It was really a wonderful light. It seemed to the little girl that she was sitting by a large iron stove, with polished brass feet and a brass ornament. How the fire burned! and seemed so beautifully warm that the child stretched out her feet as if to warm them, when, lo! the flame of the match went out, the stove vanished, and she had only the remains of the half-burnt match in her hand.
  8. #48
    “Grandmother,” cried the little one, “O take me with you; I know you will go away when the match burns out; you will vanish like the warm stove, the roast goose, and the large, glorious Christmas-tree.”
  9. #49
    [S]he made haste to light the whole bundle of matches, for she wished to keep her grandmother there. And the matches glowed with a light that was brighter than the noon-day, and her grandmother had never appeared so large or so beautiful. She took the little girl in her arms, and they both flew upwards in brightness and joy far above the earth, where there was neither cold nor hunger nor pain, for they were with God.
  10. #50
    “Rejoice in thy youth,” said the sunbeam; “rejoice in thy fresh growth, and the young life that is in thee.”
  1. #51
    Yet it remained unsatisfied, and would exclaim, “Oh, if I could but keep on growing tall and old! There is nothing else worth caring for in the world!”
  2. #52
    And the wind kissed the tree, and the dew watered it with tears; but the fir-tree regarded them not.
  3. #53
    “We have looked in at the windows of the houses in the town, and we know what is done with them. They are dressed up in the most splendid manner. We have seen them standing in the middle of a warm room, and adorned with all sorts of beautiful things—honey cakes, gilded apples, playthings, and many hundreds of wax tapers.”
  4. #54
    “Oh, how I wish I were tall enough to go on the sea,” said the fir-tree.
  5. #55
    “I wonder whether anything so brilliant will ever happen to me,” thought the fir-tree. “It would be much better than crossing the sea. I long for it almost with pain. Oh! when will Christmas be here? I am now as tall and well grown as those which were taken away last year. Oh! that I were now laid on the wagon, or standing in the warm room, with all that brightness and splendor around me!”
  6. #56
    “Rejoice with us,” said the air and the sunlight. “Enjoy thine own bright life in the fresh air.”
    But the tree would not rejoice, though it grew taller every day; and, winter and summer, its dark-green foliage might be seen in the forest, while passers by would say, “What a beautiful tree!”
  7. #57
    A short time before Christmas, the discontented fir-tree was the first to fall. As the axe cut through the stem, and divided the pith, the tree fell with a groan to the earth, conscious of pain and faintness, and forgetting all its anticipations of happiness, in sorrow at leaving its home in the forest.
  8. #58
    The tree first recovered itself while being unpacked in the courtyard of a house, with several other trees; and it heard a man say, “We only want one, and this is the prettiest.”
  9. #59
    And now the folding doors were thrown open, and a troop of children rushed in as if they intended to upset the tree; they were followed more silently by their elders. For a moment the little ones stood silent with astonishment, and then they shouted for joy, till the room rang, and they danced merrily round the tree, while one present after another was taken from it.
  10. #60
    At last the candles burnt down to the branches and were put out. Then the children received permission to plunder the tree. Oh, how they rushed upon it, till the branches cracked, and had it not been fastened with the glistening star to the ceiling, it must have been thrown down. The children then danced about with their pretty toys, and no one noticed the tree, except the children’s maid who came and peeped among the branches to see if an apple or a fig had been forgotten.

Books about love

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More Than Balloons book
Board book
6.2
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The Rag Coat book
Picture book
6.1
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Three Little Words book
Picture book
6.0
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All the Places to Love book
Picture book
6.0
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Penguin and Pinecone book
Board book
6.0
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The Trumpet of the Swan book
Chapter book
6.0
Add to list
Spot Loves His Daddy book
Board book
6.0
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Charlotte and the Rock book
Picture book
5.9
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  1. #61
    After this the fir-tree became quite silent and thoughtful; never had the birds in the forest told such tales as “Humpty Dumpty,” who fell down stairs, and yet married a princess.
  2. #62
    “To-morrow I will not tremble,” thought he; “I will enjoy all my splendor, and I shall hear the story of Humpty Dumpty again, and perhaps Ivede-Avede.” And the tree remained quiet and thoughtful all night. In the morning the servants and the housemaid came in. “Now,” thought the fir, “all my splendor is going to begin again.” But they dragged him out of the room and up stairs to the garret, and threw him on the floor, in a dark corner, where no daylight shone, and there they left him.
  3. #63
    So the tree was completely hidden from sight as if it had never existed. “It is winter now,” thought the tree, “the ground is hard and covered with snow, so that people cannot plant me. I shall be sheltered here, I dare say, until spring comes. How thoughtful and kind everybody is to me! Still I wish this place were not so dark, as well as lonely, with not even a little hare to look at. How pleasant it was out in the forest while the snow lay on the ground, when the hare would run by, yes, and jump over me too, although I did not like it then. Oh! it is terrible lonely here.”
  4. #64
    “I know nothing of that place,” said the fir-tree, “but I know the wood where the sun shines and the birds sing.” And then the tree told the little mice all about its youth. They had never heard such an account in their lives; and after they had listened to it attentively, they said, “What a number of things you have seen? you must have been very happy.”
  5. #65
    The more he talked the more he remembered, and then he thought to himself, “Those were happy days, but they may come again. Humpty Dumpty fell down stairs, and yet he married the princess; perhaps I may marry a princess too.” And the fir-tree thought of the pretty little birch-tree that grew in the forest, which was to him a real beautiful princess.
  6. #66
    “Only one,” replied the fir-tree; “I heard it on the happiest evening of my life; but I did not know I was so happy at the time.”
  7. #67
    In the same courtyard two of the merry children were playing who had danced round the tree at Christmas, and had been so happy. The youngest saw the gilded star, and ran and pulled it off the tree. “Look what is sticking to the ugly old fir-tree,” said the child, treading on the branches till they crackled under his boots.
  8. #68
    It thought of its fresh youth in the forest, of the merry Christmas evening, and of the little mice who had listened to the story of “Humpty Dumpty.” “Past! past!” said the old tree; “Oh, had I but enjoyed myself while I could have done so! but now it is too late.”
  9. #69
    “To move, to breathe, to fly, to float,
    To gain all while you give,
    To roam the roads of lands remote,
    To travel is to live.”
  10. #70
    “Life itself is the most wonderful fairy tale.”
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