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dogs Quotes

77 of the best book quotes about dogs
  1. #1
    ″‘Oh Yeah?’ I said. ‘How about Hitler? What was his redeeming quality?’
    ‘Hitler loved dogs,’ Mom said without hesitation.”
  2. #2
    “It experienced a vague but menacing apprehension that subdued it and made it slink along at the man’s heels. ”
  3. #3
    “Sometimes he wished he had no ambitions—often wondered where they had come from in his life, because he remembered how satisfied he had been as a youngster, and that with the little he had—a dog, a stick, an aloneness he loved.”
  4. #4
    “He spoke to the dog ... but in his voice was a strange note of fear that frightened the animal. ”
  5. #5
    “The only caresses it had ever received were the caresses of the whip-lash and of harsh and menacing throat-sounds that threatened the whip-lash. ”
  6. #6
    “Again I must remind you that
    A Dog’s a Dog- A CAT’S A CAT.”
  7. #7
    “I swear to you, Athenians, by the dog I swear!”
  8. #8
    “This is what happened to dogs who tried to live in the world without people—they became beaten down, defeated, starved.”
  9. #9
    “If I was such a good dog, why was I being abandoned by my owner?”
  1. #10
    “Dogs have important jobs, like barking when the doorbell rings, but cats have no function in a house whatsoever.”
  2. #11
    “My purpose, my whole life, had been to love him and be with him, to make him happy.”
  3. #12
    “The Pekes and the Pollicles, everyone knows,
    Are proud and implacable passionate foes;
    It is always the same, wherever one goes.
    And the Pugs and the Poms, although most people say
    That they do not like fighting, yet once in a way,
    They will now and again join in to the fray
    And they
    Bark bark bark bark
    Bark bark BARK BARK
    Until you can hear them all over the Park.”
  4. #13
    “Her sadness came off her and washed into me, and I pulled against the noose, wanting to go comfort her.”
  5. #14
    “One of my favorite things to do was to learn new tricks, as the boy called them, which consisted of him speaking to me in encouraging tones and then feeding me treats.”
  6. #15
    “I had fulfilled my purpose and there was no reason for me to be a dog anymore. So whether it happened this summer or the next didn’t matter. Ethan, loving Ethan, was my ultimate purpose, and I had done it as well as I could. I was a good dog.”
  7. #16
    “I guess I had never bothered to consider that there might such a thing as a boy, but now that I had found one, I thought it was just about the most wonderful concept in the world. He smelled of mud and sugar and an animal I’d never scented before, and a faint meaty odor clung to his fingers, so I licked them.”
  8. #17
    ″‘I told you. On his eleventh birthday. At three o’clock in the afternoon. It’ll sort of home in on him. He’s supposed to name it himself.‘”
  9. #18
    “I felt anger and fear and pain coming from him, but I didn’t back away, I stayed right there, and knew I had done the right thing when he buried his face in my neck and cried some more.”

Books about grief

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Grandpa's Top Threes book
Picture book
6.4
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Ida, Always book
Picture book
6.0
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A Stopwatch from Grampa book
Picture book
5.3
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Something Very Sad Happened book
Picture book
5.0
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Where Lily Isn't book
Picture book
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The Rough Patch book
Picture book
5.0
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Dance Like a Leaf book
Picture book
4.8
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The Goodbye Book book
Picture book
4.8
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  1. #19
    “Why did dogs make one want to cry? There was something so quiet and hopeless about their sympathy. Jasper, knowing something was wrong, as dogs always do. Trunks being packed. Cars being brought to the door. Dogs standing with drooping tails, dejected eyes. Wandering back to their baskets in the hall when the sound of the car dies away.”
  2. #20
    “It was wonderful indeed how I could have heart-to-heart talks with my dogs and they always seemed to understand. Each question I asked was answered in their own doggish way.”
  3. #21
    “Now look, for instance, at the way they serve dogs, cutting off their tails to make them look plucky, and shearing up their pretty little ears to a point to make them look sharp.”
  4. #22
    Roses are grey,
    violets are a different shade of grey,
    let’s go chase cars!
  5. #23
    “Winn-Dixie looked straight at me when I said that to him, like he was feeling relieved to finally have somebody understand his situation. I nodded my head at him and went on talking.”
  6. #24
    “All of a sudden it was hard for me to talk. I loved the preacher so much. I loved him because he loved Winn-Dixie. I loved him because he was going to forgive Winn-Dixie for being afraid. But most of all, I loved him for putting his arms around Winn-Dixie like that, like he was already trying to keep him safe.”
  7. #25
    “A dog doesn’t care if you are rich or poor, educated or illiterate, clever or dull. Give him your heart and he will give you his.”
  8. #26
    “It’s hard not to immediately fall in love with a dog who has a good sense of humor.”
  9. #27
    “He taught us the are of unqualified love. How to give it, how to accept it. Where there is that, most other pieces fall into place.”
  1. #28
    “Dogs are great. Bad dogs, if you can really call them that, are perhaps the greatest of them all.”
  2. #29
    “I could see that Winn-Dixie was having a good effect on the preacher. He was making him poke his head out of his shell.”
  3. #30
    “Our rambunctious, wired dog stood with his shoulders between Jenny’s knees, his big, blocky head resting quietly in her lap.”
  4. #31
    “A dog has no use for fancy cars or big homes or designer clothes.”
  5. #32
    ″‘Are you looking for a home?’ the preacher asked, real soft, to Winn-Dixie.
    Winn-Dixie wagged his tail.
    ‘Well,’ the preacher said. ‘I guess you’ve found one.‘”
  6. #33
    “It’s just the most amazing thing to love a dog, isn’t it? It makes our relationships with people seem as boring as a bowl of oatmeal.”
  7. #34
    “And as he grew old and achy, he taught me about optimism in the face of adversity. Mostly, he taught me about friendship and selflessness and, above all else, unwavering loyalty. ”
  8. #35
    ″‘You know all that stuff we’ve always said about you? I whispered, ‘What a total pain you are? Don’t believe it. Don’t believe it for a minute, Marley.’ He needed to know that and something more, too. There was something I had never told him, that no one ever had. I wanted him to hear it before he went. ‘Marley,’ I said. ‘You are a great dog.‘”
  9. #36
    “If you still think you’re a young pup then you are, no matter what the calendar says.”

Books about love

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More Than Balloons book
Board book
6.2
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The Rag Coat book
Picture book
6.1
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Three Little Words book
Picture book
6.0
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All the Places to Love book
Picture book
6.0
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Penguin and Pinecone book
Board book
6.0
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Spot Loves His Daddy book
Board book
6.0
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The Trumpet of the Swan book
Chapter book
6.0
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Wherever You Are book
Picture book
5.9
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  1. #37
    “This animal had touched our souls and taught us some of the most important lessons of our lives.”
  2. #38
    “A person can learn a lot from a dog, even a loopy one like ours. Marley taught me about living each day with unbridled exuberance and joy, about seizing the moment and following your heart. He taught me to appreciate the simple things- a walk in the woods, a fresh snowfall, a nap in a shaft of winter sunlight. ”
  3. #39
    “Owning a dog always ended with this sadness because dogs just don’t live as long as people do. ”
  4. #40
    “The deal I had struck with Jenny when I agreed to come here was that we would check the pups out, ask some questions, and keep an open mind as to whether we were ready to bring home a dog ‘This is the first ad we’re answering’ I had said. ‘Let’s not make any snap decisions.’ But thirty seconds into it, I could see I had already lost the battle. There was no question that before the night was through one of these puppies would be ours.”
  5. #41
    “As pathetic as it sounds, Marley had become my male-bonding soul mate, my near-constant companion, my friend. He was the undisciplined, recalcitrant, nonconformist, politically incorrect free spirit I had always wanted to be, had I been brave enough, and I took vicarious joy in his unbridled verve. No matter how complicated life became, he reminded me of its simple joys. No matter how many demands were placed on me, he never let me forget that willful disobedience is sometimes worth the price. In a world full of bosses, he was his own master.”
  6. #42
    “During our next outing, Marley surgically removed the woofer cone from the same speaker. The speaker wasn’t knocked over or in any way amiss; the paper cone was simply gone, as if someone had sliced it out with a razor blade. Eventually he got around to doing the same to the other speaker. Another time, we came home to find that our four-legged footstool was now three-legged, and there was no sign whatsoever—not a single splinter—of the missing limb.”
  7. #43
    “I believed that Fufi was my dog but of course that wasn’t true. Fufi was a dog. I was a boy. We got along well. She happened to live in my house. That experience shaped what I’ve felt about relationships for the rest of my life: You do not own the thing that you love.”
  8. #44
    “Guys always call as soon as another man is interested. They’re like dogs: They never notice if you’ve changed your hair, but they can sense when there’s another guy sniffing around their territory.”
  9. #45
    “Treat ‘em like dogs, and you’ll have dogs’ works and dogs’ actions. Treat ‘em like men, and you’ll have men’s works.”
  1. #46
    “I buried Little Ann by the side of Old Dan. I knew that was where she wanted to be. I also buried a part of my life along with my dog.”
  2. #47
    “People have been trying to understand dogs ever since the beginning of time. One never knows what they’ll do. You can read every day where a dog saved the life of a drowning child, or lay down his life for his master. Some people call this loyalty. I don’t. I may be wrong, but I call it love - the deepest kind of love.”
  3. #48
    “It’s a shame that people all over the world can’t have that kind of love in their hearts,” he said. “There would be no wars, slaughter, or murder; no greed or selfishness. It would be the kind of world that God wants us to have - a wonderful world.”
  4. #49
    “Old Dan must have known he was dying. Just before he drew his last breath, he opened his eyes and looked at me. Then with one last sigh, and a feeble thump of his tail, his friendly gray eyes closed forever.”
  5. #50
    “I found her lying on her stomach, her hind legs stretched out straight, and her front feet folded back under her chest. She had laid her head on his grave. I saw the trail where she had dragged herself through the leaves. The way she lay there, I thought she was alive. I called her name. She made no movement. With the last ounce of strength in her body, she had dragged herself to the grave of Old Dan.”
  6. #51
    “What I saw was more than I could stand. The noise I heard had been made by Little Ann. All her life she had slept by Old Dan’s side. And although he was dead, she had left the doghouse, had come back to the porch, and snuggled up by his side.”
  7. #52
    “With a heavy heart, I turned and walked away. I knew that as long as I lived I’d never forget the two little graves and the sacred red fern.”
  8. #53
    “I suppose there’s a time in practically every young boy’s life when he’s affected by that wonderful disease of puppy love. I don’t mean the kind a boy has for the pretty little girl that lives down the road. I mean the real kind, the kind that has four small feet and a wiggly tail, and sharp little teeth that can gnaw on a boy’s finger; the kind a boy can romp and play with, even eat and sleep with.”
  9. #54
    “Some time in the night I got up, tiptoed to my window, and looked out at my doghouse. It looked so lonely and empty sitting there in the moonlight. I could see that the door was slightly ajar. I thought of the many times I had lain in my bed and listened to the squeaking of the door as my dogs went in and out. I didn’t know I was crying until I felt the tears roll down my cheeks.”
  1. #55
    “I wanted so much to step over and pick them up. Several times I tried to move my feet, but they seemed to be nailed to the floor. I knew the pups were mine, all mine, yet I couldn’t move. My heart started aching like a drunk grasshopper. I tried to swallow and couldn’t. My Adam’s apple wouldn’t work. One pup started my way. I held my breath. On he came until I felt a scratchy little foot on mine. The other pup followed. A warm puppy tongue caressed my sore foot. I heard the stationmaster say, ‘They already know you.’ I knelt down and gathered them in my arms. I buried my face between their wiggling bodies and cried.”
  2. #56
    “I had rather hear my dog bark
    at a crow than a man swear he loves me.”
  3. #57
    “Cry ‘havoc,’ and let slip the dogs of war.”
  4. #58
    ″... she knew that nothing could hurt her while Pa and Jack were there.”
  5. #59
    “Most of all he felt sorry for his dog, because he could see the bugs landing on and settling all over him, and probably getting into the dog’s lungs, as they were in his own.”
  6. #60
    “Is he friendly?” Tom says quietly. “I’ve discovered,” Jules says, “that a dog will become fast friends with the people who feed him.”
  7. #61
    “A dog, particularly an exotic like Charley, is a bond between strangers.”
  8. #62
    “If I ever meet one of these dogs I’m going
    to invite him to come here, where he can
    be a proper dog.”
  9. #63
    “Steadfastness, it seems, is more about dogs than about us. One of the reasons we love them so much.”
  1. #64
    “With what vigor
    and intention to please himself
    the little white dog
    flings himself into every puddle
    on the muddy road.”
  2. #65
    “In the old days dogs in our town roamed freely. But the old ways changed.”
  3. #66
    “For he was an instrument for the children to learn benevolence upon.”
  4. #67
    “For he was of the tribe of Wolf.”
  5. #68
    “The university gave me a new, elegant
    classroom to teach in. Only one thing,
    they said. You can’t bring your dog.
    It’s in my contract, I said. (I had
    made sure of that.)”
  6. #69
    “Be prepared. A dog is adorable and noble.
    A dog is a true and loving friend. A dog
    is also a hedonist.”
  7. #70
    “He really is as big as
    a horse, but actually a very sweet
    horse. I hope he comes again.”
  8. #71
    “It is summer
    How many summers does a little dog have?”
  9. #72
    “This is a poem about Percy
    This is a poem about more than Percy.
    Think about it.”
  10. #73
    ″...who am I to summon his hard and happy body
    his four white feet that love to wheel and pedal
    through the dark leaves
    to come back to walk by my side, obedient.”
  11. #74
    “You love
    this earnest dog,
    but also you admire the raccoon
    and Lord help you in your place
    of hope and improbables.”
  12. #75
    “Our new dog, named for the beloved poet, ate a book which unfortunately we had left unguarded.”
  13. #76
    “What would the world be like without music or rivers or the green and tender grass? What would this world be like without dogs?”
  14. #77
    “It is only dogs that never bite their masters.”
Book Topics › dogs
Children's Books About Dogs
Book Topics › crying
Children's Books About Crying
Book Topics › talking
Children's Books About Talking
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