concept

stories Quotes

87 of the best book quotes about stories
  1. #1
    “I could tell you a scary story to get your teeth chattering,
    Something about a really old man, sitting in a squeaky rocking chair, pointing at you.”
  2. #2
    “If at the end of a war story you feel uplifted, or if you feel that some small bit of rectitude has been salvaged from the larger waste, then you have been made the victim of a very old and terrible lie.”
  3. #3
    “It’s safe to say that in a true war story nothing is ever absolutely true.”
  4. #4
    “I’m skimming across the surface of my own history, moving fast, riding the melt beneath the blades, doing loops and spins, and when I take a high leap into the dark and come down thirty years later, I realize it is as Tim trying to save Timmy’s life with a story.”
  5. #5
    “I want you to feel what I felt. I want you to know why story-truth is truer sometimes than happening-truth.”
  6. #6
    “A man who tells secrets or stories must think of who is hearing or reading, for a story has as many versions as it has readers. Everyone takes what he wants or can from it and thus changes it to his measure. Some pick out parts and reject the rest, some strain the story through their mesh of prejudice, some paint it with their own delight. ”
  7. #7
    “In school, we learned about the world before ours, about the angels and gods that lived in the sky, ruling the earth with kind and loving hands. Some say those are just stories, but I don’t believe that.
    The gods rule us still. They have come down from the stars. And they are no longer kind.”
  8. #8
    “First you will smile, and then you will cry—don’t say you haven’t been warned.”
  9. #9
    “Their tales of woe and fear unspeakable gushed forth and beat upon my ears. They told me stories of their friends and relatives who had said unguarded things in public and disappeared without a trace, stories of the Gestapo, stories of neighbours’ quarrels and petty personal spite turned into political persecution, stories of concentration camps and pogroms, stories of rich Jews stripped and beaten and robbed of everything they had and then denied the right to earn a pauper’s wage”
  10. #10
    “This is the end of a story that even people who are not usually amazed at anything may refuse to believe. But I am armed in advance against human incredulity.”
  1. #11
    “Some stories don’t need telling.”
  2. #12
    “What a tale their terror tells.”
  3. #13
    “You will observe that the stories told are all about money-seekers, not about money-finders.”
  4. #14
    “Every story matters...We are all worthy of telling our stories and having them heard. We all need to be seen and honored in the same way that we all need to breathe.”
  5. #15
    “If we can share our story with someone who responds with empathy and understanding, shame can’t survive.”
  6. #16
    ″‘She’s just doing Margo stuff. Making stories. Rocking worlds.‘”
  7. #17
    “My story ends with freedom; not in the usual way, with marriage.”
  8. #18
    “But I was beginning to learn that your life is a story told about you, not one that you tell.
    Of course, you pretend to be the author. You have to.”
  9. #19
    “Your story is what you have, what you will always have. It is something to own.”
  10. #20
    “Would you like to hear my story, Bella? It doesn’t have a happy ending – but which of ours does? If we had happy endings, we’d all be under gravestones now.”

Books about courage

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Off & Away book
Picture book
6.1
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I Am So Brave! book
Board book
6.0
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Tomorrow I'll Be Brave book
Picture book
6.0
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The Last of the Really Great Whangdoodles book
Chapter book
5.9
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Jabari Jumps book
Picture book
5.8
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What Do You Do with a Chance book
Picture book
5.8
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Big Papa and the Time Machine book
Picture book
5.8
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My Brave Year of Firsts book
Picture book
5.8
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  1. #21
    “We all create stories to protect ourselves.”
  2. #22
    “It was like breakers upon a beach; there was new water, but the wave looked just the same. He strolled about and talked with them, and the biggest of them told tales of their prowess, while those who were weaker, or younger and inexperienced, gathered round and listened in admiring silence. The last time he was there, Jurgis had thought of little but his family; but now he was free to listen to these men, and to realize that he was one of them—that their point of view was his point of view, and that the way they kept themselves alive in the world was the way he meant to do it in the future.”
  3. #23
    “Men tell stories,” I say. It is the truest, simplest answer to his question. “Women get on with it.”
  4. #24
    “Some day you will write a great story out of your own head, that will be a comfort and help to many.”
  5. #25
    “The little horse had drawn more newspaper coverage in 1938 than Roosevelt, who was Second, Hitler (third), Mussolini (fourth), or any other newsmaker. His match with War Admiral was almost certainly the single biggest news story of the year and one of the biggest sports moments of the century.”
  6. #26
    “By telling stories, you objectify your own experience. You separate it from yourself. You pin down certain truths. You make up others. You start sometimes with an incident that truly happened, like the night in the...field, and you carry it forward by inventing incidents that did not in fact occur but that nonetheless help to clarify and explain.”
  7. #27
    “It’s important that you know. Our family memory must not be lost.”
  8. #28
    “I like to see people reunited, maybe that’s a silly thing, but what can I say, I like to see people run into each other, I like the kissing and the crying, I like the impatience, the stories that the mouth can’t tell fast enough, the ears that aren’t big enough, the eyes that can’t take in all of the change, I like the hugging, the bringing together, the end of missing someone…”
  9. #29
    “If you tell stories, you like nothing so much as to tell them to people who want to listen.”
  10. #30
    “We tell ourselves there are reasons for the things that happen, but we’re just telling ourselves stories. We make them up. They don’t mean anything.”
  1. #31
    “Between the lines of every story there is another story, and that is one that is never heard and can only be guessed at by the people who are good at guessing.”
  2. #32
    “Stories are the wildest things of all, the monster rumbled. Stories chase and bite and hunt.”
  3. #33
    ″‘What you saw belongs to you. A story doesn’t live until it is imagined in someone’s mind.’
    ‘What does the story mean, then?’
    ‘It means what you want it to mean,’ Hoid said. ‘The purpose of a storyteller is not to tell you how to think, but to give you questions to think upon. Too often, we forget that.‘”
  4. #34
    “ ‘We all have stories, just as you do. Ways in which he touched us, helped us, gave us money, sold it to us wholesale. Lots of stories, big and small. They all add up. Over a lifetime it all adds up. That’s why we’re here, William. We’re a a part of him, who he is, just as he is a part of us. You still don’t understand, do you?’
    I didn’t. But as I stared at the man and he stared back at me, in my father’s dream I remembered where we’d met before.
    ‘And what did my father do for you?’ I asked him, and the old man smiled.
    ‘He made me laugh,’ he said.”
  5. #35
    “It’s like everyone tells a story about themselves inside their own head. Always. All the time. That story makes you what you are. We build ourselves out of that story.”
  6. #36
    “All stories are true.”
  7. #37
    “And people will say: ‘Let’s hear about Frodo and the Ring!’ And they’ll say: ‘Yes, that’s one of my favorite stories. Frodo was very brave, wasn’t he dad?’ ‘Yes, my boy, the famousest of the hobbits, and that’s saying a lot.‘”
  8. #38
    “That’s what the leadership was teaching me, day by day: that the self-interest I was supposed to be looking for extended well beyond the immediacy of issues, that beneath the small talk and sketchy biographies and received opinions, people carried with them some central explanation of themselves. Stories full of terror and wonder, studded with events that still haunted or inspired them. Sacred stories.”
  9. #39
    “What a tale we have been in, Mr. Frodo, haven’t we?”
  10. #40
    “All stories told have been told before. We tell them to ourselves, as did all men who ever were. And all men who ever will be. The only things new are the names.”

Books about storytelling

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Fortunately, the Milk book
Chapter book
5.3
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Once Upon a Baby Brother book
Picture book
5.0
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Campfire Stories book
Chapter book
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The Granddaughter Necklace book
Picture book
5.0
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Ta-Da! book
Picture book
5.0
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Mira and the Big Story book
Picture book
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The Storyteller book
Picture book
4.8
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  1. #41
    ″ So much of the ritual had been forgotten or discarded. ”
  2. #42
    “I was thinking about framing, and how so much of what we think about our lives and our personal histories revolves around how we frame it. The lens we see it through, or the way we tell our own stories. We mythologize ourselves.”
  3. #43
    ″‘Hide them. Keep them safe for me,’ I said, putting my hands on top of his. ‘I don’t know where we’re going. I don’t want them to be destroyed. There’s so much of me, of all of us, in these drawings.‘”
  4. #44
    “As a girl, she had come to believe in the ideal man -- the prince or knight of her childhood stories. In the real world, however, men like that simply didn’t exist.”
  5. #45
    “A young person cannot judge what is allegorical and what is literal; anything that he receives into his mind at that age is likely to become indelible and unalterable; and therefore it is most important that the tales which the young first hear should be models of virtuous thoughts.”
  6. #46
    “Stories are as unique as the people who tell them, and the best stories are in which the ending is a surprise.”
  7. #47
    “And if Aslan himself comes, (Cair Paravel) would be the best place for meeting him too, for every story says that he is the son of the great Emperor-over-the-Sea, and over the sea he will pass.”
  8. #48
    “My mother, I have seen another [dream. I beheld] my likeness in the street. In Erech of the wide spaces he hurled the axe, and they assembled about him.”
  9. #49
    “Over the years, she told me the same story, except for the ending, which grew darker, casting long shadows into her life, and eventually into mine.”
  10. #50
    “‘You can stay in this world, this world you love, as long as you want, as long as you keep thinking of new stories—’”
  1. #51
    “In that narrow cut of light I saw a face that seemed to have been transplanted directly from the nightmares of my childhood.”
  2. #52
    “There was a girl who could fly, a boy who had bees living inside him, a brother and sister who could lift boulders over their heads.”
  3. #53
    “I’m telling tales, my dear, not lies. Lies are mean things, and tales are meant to entertain.”
  4. #54
    “I don’t think it was a lie, Maxwell, do you? I think he needed something to hope for and so he invented this rather remarkable fantasy you describe. Everybody needs something to hope for. Don’t call it a lie. Kevin wasn’t a liar.”
  5. #55
    “I won’t have the time, so you’ll have to do it. Just write it all down like you’re talking. Put in all the fun we had, the cool things we did. Our adventures.”
  6. #56
    “Our stories are obviously specific to our two lives, but I hope they will illuminate the crucial inflection points in every life, the sudden moments of decision where our paths diverge and our fates are sealed.”
  7. #57
    ″‘But they’re stories,’ I said. ‘They’re—myths, to explain lightning and the seasons and stuff. They’re what people believed before there was science.‘”
  8. #58
    “I’ve heard so many stories I don’t know which one is the most popular. But I do know which is the least popular.
    The truth.”
  9. #59
    “If we don’t tell strange stories, when something strange happens we won’t believe it.”
  10. #60
    “No story sits by itself. Sometimes stories meet at corners and sometimes they cover one another completely, like stones beneath a river.”
  1. #61
    “I like my tale better,” said Littlefinger, “and so will the smallfolk. Most of them believe that if a woman eats rabbit while pregnant, her child will be born with long floppy ears.”
  2. #62
    “The most dangerous stories we make up are the narratives that diminish our inherent worthiness. We must reclaim the truth about our lovability, divinity, and creativity.”
  3. #63
    “We don’t want to betray anyone - we don’t want to be the first to get curious and ask questions or challenge the stories. We ask ourselves, How can I love and protect my family if I’m rumbling with these hard truths? For me, the answer to that question is another question: How can I love and protect my family if I’m not rumbling with these hard truths?”
  4. #64
    “A small, quiet, grassroots movement that starts with each of us saying, ‘My story matters because I matter.’ A movement where we can take to the streets with our messy, imperfect, wild, stretch-marked, wonderful, heartbreaking, grace-filled, and joyful lives. A movement fueled by the freedom that comes when we stop pretending that everything is okay when it isn’t. A call that rises up from our bellies when we find the courage to celebrate those intensely joyful moments even though we’ve convinced ourselves that savoring happiness is inviting disaster.”
  5. #65
    “Each of the stories we tell and hear is like a small flicker of light - when we have enough of them, we will set the world on fire. But I don’t think we can do it without story. It doesn’t matter what community is in question or what the conflict appears to be on the surface, resolution and change will require people to own, share, and rumble with stories.”
  6. #66
    “Do you know,” Peter asked, “why swallows build in the eaves of houses? It is to listen to the stories.”
  7. #67
    “Those are the most important stories to share. You can use that strength to pave a path for others to follow along behind.”
  8. #68
    “Some stories don’t have happy endings. Even love stories. Maybe especially love stories.”
  9. #69
    “’It IS a story,’ said Sara. ‘EVERYTHING’S a story. You are a story—I am a story. Miss Minchin is a story.’”
  10. #70
    “I used to want a great many things before, and to be angry that I did not have them. Theoretically, I was satisfied. I flattered myself that I had limited my wants. But I was subject to irritation; I used to have morbid sterile hateful fits of hunger, of desire. Now I really am satisfied, because I can’t think of anything better. It’s just as when one has been trying to spell out a book in the twilight, and suddenly the lamp comes in. I had been putting out my eyes over the book of life, and finding nothing to reward me for my pains; but now that I can read it properly I see that it’s a delightful story.”
  1. #71
    “What about a story?” said Christopher Robin.
  2. #72
    “Every great love starts with a great story. . .”
  3. #73
    “I’m much better at interpreting books and stories than I am at understanding the decisions made by living, breathing people.”
  4. #74
    “He never lost the feeling he had in his chest when she spoke those words, as she did each time she told them stories; and he still felt it was true, despite all they had taught him in school—that long long ago things had been different, and human beings could understand what the animals said, and once the Gambler had trapped the storm clouds on his mountaintop.”
  5. #75
    “A new terror born in death, a new superstition entering the unassailable fortress of forever. I am legend.”
  6. #76
    “I pray God will curse the writer, as the writer has cursed the world with this beautiful, stupendous creation, terrible in its simplicity, irresistible in its truth--a world which now trembles before the King in Yellow.”
  7. #77
    “I kept imagining these people, just living their daily lives, and then having them suddenly ended in unjust tragedy. When we watch the news, we grieve all of this, but when we go to the movies, we want more of it. Somehow we realize that great stories are told in conflict, but we are unwilling to embrace the potential greatness of the story we are actually in.”
  8. #78
    “The stories of past courage can define that ingredient—they can teach, they can offer hope, they can provide inspiration.”
  9. #79
    “She’s realized the real problem with stories -- if you keep them going long enough, they always end in death.”
  10. #80
    “I suppose at one time in my life I might have had any number of stories, but now there is no other. This is the only story I will ever be able to tell.”
  11. #81
    “We hunger to understand, so we invent myths about how we imagine the world is constructed – and they’re, of course, based upon what we know, which is ourselves and other animals. So we make up stories about how the world was hatched from a cosmic egg or created after the mating of cosmic deities or by some fiat of a powerful being.”
  12. #82
    “I usually tell the two Z’s stories about home, and about Dad and our Bahkhuls or Arjays. Yes, it is good they hear these stories. Not about things from here.”
  13. #83
    “And on my life I would never suggest to you that stories cannot be forgotten in the bone, even when a brother or a wizard or a rifle says you must, you must forget it, it never happened; there is only the world as it is now, and there has never been another, can never be any other.”
  14. #84
    “I will not let her speak because I love her, and when you love someone you do not make them tell war stories. A war story is a black space. On the one side is before and on the other side is after, and what is inside belongs only to the dead.”
  15. #85
    “Such amusing fiction, these stories they tell. It always comes to this. If they really had a desire to live, they would’ve been more aware of how easy it is to die, would’ve chosen their actions more wisely. In these moments, you can tell they’re not regretting having hurt you, they regret doing it to your face.”
  16. #86
    “I listened to their stories and found so many areas where we overlapped – not all the deeds, but the feelings of remorse and hopelessness. I learned that alcoholism isn’t a sin, it’s a disease.”
  17. #87
    “That’s how Mother told stories. Never enough detail, and she always left you hanging at the end.”
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