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Robert Louis Stevenson Quotes

24 of the best book quotes from Robert Louis Stevenson
  1. #1
    “If I am the chief of sinners, I am the chief of sufferers also.”
  2. #2
    “Under the strain of this continually impending doom and by the sleeplessness to which I now condemned myself, ay, even beyond what I had thought possible to man, I became, in my own person, a creature eaten up and emptied by fever, languidly weak both in body and mind, and solely occupied by one thought: the horror of my other self.”
  3. #3
    “She had an evil face, smoothed by hypocrisy; but her manners were excellent.”
  4. #4
    “This was the shocking thing; that the slime of the pit seemed to utter cries and voices; that the amorphous dust gesticulated and sinned; that what was dead, and had no shape, should usurp the offices of life. And this again, that that insurgent horror was knit to him closer than a wife, closer than an eye; lay caged in his flesh, where he heard it mutter and felt it struggle to be born; and at every hour of weakness, and in the confidence of slumber, prevailed against him, and deposed him out of life.”
  5. #5
    “It was for one minute that I saw him, but the hair stood upon my head like quills. Sir, if that was my master, why had he a mask upon his face?”
  6. #6
    “Strange as my circumstances were, the terms of this debate
    are as old and commonplace as man; much the same inducements and
    alarms cast the die for any tempted and trembling sinner; and it
    fell out with me, as it falls with so vast a majority of my
    fellows, that I chose the better part and was found wanting in the
    strength to keep to it.”
  7. #7
    “To cast in it with Hyde was to die a thousand interests and aspirations.”
  8. #8
    “You start a question, and it’s like starting a stone. You sit quietly on the top of a hill; and away the stone goes, starting others...”
  1. #9
    “I learned to recognise the thorough and primitive duality of man; I saw that, of the two natures that contended in the field of my consciousness, even if I could rightly be said to be either, it was only because I was radically both.”
  2. #10
    “It is one thing to mortify curiosity, another to conquer it. ”
  3. #11
    “I sometimes think if we knew all, we should be more glad to get away.”
  4. #12
    “The less I understood of this farrago, the less I was in a position to judge of its importance.”
  5. #13
    “With every day, and from both sides of my intelligence, the moral and the intellectual, I thus drew steadily nearer to the truth, by whose partial discovery I have been doomed to such a dreadful shipwreck: that man is not truly one, but truly two.”
  6. #14
    “Jekyll had more than a father’s interest; Hyde had more than a son’s indifference.”
  7. #15
    “I incline to Cain’s heresy,” he used to say quaintly: “I let my brother go to the devil in his own way.”
  8. #16
    “If he be Mr. Hyde,” he had thought, “I shall be Mr. Seek.”
  1. #17
    “O my poor old Harry Jekyll, if ever I read Satan’s signature upon a face, it is on that of your new friend.”
  2. #18
    “His affections, like ivy, were the growth of time, they implied no aptness in the object.”
  3. #19
    “Here then, as I lay down the pen and proceed to seal up my confession, I bring the life of that unhappy Henry Jekyll to an end.”
  4. #20
    “There comes an end to all things; the most capacious measure is filled at last; and this brief condescension to evil finally destroyed the balance of my soul.”
  5. #21
    “You must suffer me to go my own dark way.”
  6. #22
    “All human beings, as we meet them, are commingled out of good and evil: and Edward Hyde, alone, in the ranks of mankind, was pure evil.”
  7. #23
    “I had learned to dwell with pleasure as a beloved daydream on the
    thought of the separation of these elements. If each I told myself could be housed in separate identities life would be relieved of all that was unbearable the unjust might go his way delivered from the aspirations and remorse of his more upright twin and the just could walk steadfastly and securely on his upward path doing the good things in which he found his pleasure and no longer exposed to disgrace and penitence by the hands of this extraneous evil.”
  8. #24
    “Some day...after I am dead, you may perhaps come to learn the right and wrong of this. I cannot tell you.”
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