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children book Quotes

100+ of the best book quotes about children book
01
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It was interesting that Peggy Rathmann wrote the book in the second person, as if the reader were part of the tale. And the illustrations are wonderfully creative, with black silhouettes framed by an ever darkening, but very colorful sky. The illustrations are very funny in places, which helps to soften the dangerous situations the babies got into.
Peggy Rathmann
author
The Day the Babies Crawled Away
book
helping others
writing
interesting
readers
illustrations
amusing illustrations
children book
part of the tale
wonderfully creative
colorful sky
concepts
02
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With an expert balance of humor, sentimentality, and hopefulness, this story is a work of art (side note: the first chapter of this book is the most spectacular chapter ever written in the history of chapters. i have probably read it over 100 times. its utter perfection).
03
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A great example of an image where the wolves display both terror and humor is in the image of the wolves being shown in creepy shadows as they are watching television and are laughing their heads off.
04
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The entire book works. The color wash suits the drawing style which complements the story which is carried by mild misbehavior and mayhem.
05
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A neat little book with poetry in it reminding us how much kids can hate school, somedays I can relate. The fun part is the rhyming and showing kids no matter what you are talking about, we can put in into a poem.
06
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The rhymes and rhythms are masterfully done, and the story is delightful! This is a book that I don’t mind reading over and over. Every time we read it, we discover something new and interesting in the illustrations. This is a must read!
07
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Dave McKean’s illustrations are both haunting and hilarious at the same time. The wolves are portrayed as drawings made by a child, as it is implied on the front cover of the book. The wolves are also drawn in both a frightening and humorous way throughout the book.
08
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“Is this fresh fish from Finney’s diner?” “Of course! There’s none fresher or finer!”
09
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Don’t say he didn’t warn you. For a truly inspired family giglefest, this is the top of the charts. make slips and back flips, and your tongue may end up in Saint Looey!”
10
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Said a book-reading parrot named Hooey, “The words in this book are all phooey. When you join them your lips will make slips and back flips, and your tongue may end up in Saint Looey!”
Dr. Seuss
author
Hooey
character
11
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The tongue twisters in this book will have your children laughing for hours--and that laughter just might be directed at you! Mixing genuine words with classic Seuss vocabulary, Oh Say Can You Say gets trickier with every page.
12
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“Bed Spreaders spread spreads on beds. Bread Spreaders spread butter on breads. And that Bed Spreader better watch out how he’s spreading . . . or that Bread Spreader’s sure going to butter his bedding.”
13
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Fritz needs Fred and Fred needs Fritz. Fritz feed Fred and Fred feeds Fritz. Fred feeds Fritz with ritzy Fred food. Fritz feeds Fred with ritzy Fritz food. And Fritz, when fed, has often said, “I’m a Fred-fed Fritz. Fred’s a Fritz-fed Fred”
14
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There were some things I liked about this, and some I didn’t. I love that Clarice Bean is a bookworm, addicted to the Ruby Redford series about a young girl who lives a secret double life as an international spy. I liked the creativity in the text layout, meandering about the page as Clarice’s thoughts meander during class.
15
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“Pete Briggs pats his big pink pigs all day, (Don’t ask me why, I cannot say) Then Pete puts his patted pigs aways in his Pete Briggs’ Pink Pigs Big Pigs Pigpen.”
16
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As he gobbled the cakes on his plate, the greedy ape said as he ate, “The greener green grapes are the keener keen apes are to gobble green grape cakes. They’re GREAT!”
17
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He thinks they are at the pool and he is determined to fearlessly cannonball into the pool and make a big loud splash that would wake the Colonel and he would be running ahead and lead them home and they would admire him and he would be in charge for the first time ever. That was what he hoped for anyway, but instead, he finds they aren’t there and the Colonel busts him and takes him home.
18
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I love the way she talks about her family, because it’s sorta different to how an adult would see it. I wasn’t super into the art style at first, but it definitely grew on me, so much so that I now think the art style really adds to the charm and value of this picture book. I’d love to read more about Clarice Bean!
19
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“It’s beautiful, Mama” said Jamela, stroking the crisp new material. “Yes, it’s beautiful. It costs a lot of money -- but I need something special to wear for Thelma’s wedding”, said Mama.
20
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When your annoying little brother shares your room, your older brother is in the tunnel of adolescence, your dad hides in his office eating rocky road ice cream and swaying to Frank Sinatra, and your mother listen to foreign language tapes in a candlelit bathtub, what can you do to get away from it all?
21
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Bright and brassy, this youngster will win over readers in a split second and will leave them hoping for more of her trials and tribulations.
22
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The incorporation of background images and settings tells the reader that this book is indeed taking place in a foreign country, and there are words from the African language translated in portions of the book. Despite the obvious African setting, this is a universal story that could take place in any country to any little girl. The colors in this book are stunning, and the story heartwarming.
23
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Jamela’s dress is an adorable story that follows an African girl as she wears her mother’s expensive fabric and parades throughout the town. The artwork is fairly realistic and lends a style to the book that flows from page to page.
24
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“I bet he’s in the pumpkin patch.” But the Duck was not in the pumpkin patch. They could not find him anywhere. So they waited...All that long afternoon... The Cat watched the door. The Squirrel paced the floor. “The Duck will be sorry when he comes home,” they muttered. But the Duck didn’t come home. Not even at soup time.
25
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“That’s mine!” squeaked the Squirrel. “Stirring is my job. Give that back!” “You’re much too small.” snapped the Cat. “We’ll cook the way we always have.” But the Duck held on tight... until the Squirrel tugged with all his might... and -WHOOPS!- the spoon spun through the air, and bopped the Cat on the head. Then there was trouble, a horrible squabble, a row, a racket, a rumpus in the old white cabin.
26
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Pumpkin soup. The best you ever tasted. Made by the Cat who slices up the pumpkin. Made by the Squirrel who stirs in the water. Made by the Duck who scoops up a pipkin of salt, and tips in just enough.
27
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“I’m not staying here,” wailed the Duck. ” You never let me help with anything.” And he packed up a wheelbarrow, put on his his hat, and waddled away. “You’ll be back,” stormed the Cat, “after we’ve cleaned up” And the Squirrel shook his spoon in the air. But the Duck didn’t come back. Not for breakfast. Not even for lunch. “I’ll find him”, scoffed the Cat. “He’ll be hiding outside.”
28
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Morpurgo here spins a yarn which gently captures the adventurous elements one would expect from a desert-island tale, but the real strength lies in the poignant and subtle observations of friendship, trust and, ultimately, humanity.
29
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Being a children’s book, I thought I would love it for the innocence in the writing and the illustrations. But heck, no (again!) I enjoyed it for what it is. Full of adventure, full of Robinson Crusoe vibes.
30
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However, he soon crosses paths with the island’s only other inhabitant: an irascible Japanese man named Kensuke. Despite the many differences between them, Michael and Kensuke soon become fast friends, but both of them will have to choose between their peaceful life on the island and the uncertainty of returning to civilisation…
31
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“One night they heard a gentle tap and when looked outside they saw and angel standing there her shining smile was wide.”
32
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“Hazel enjoys watching Mr Petrusca, the cheerful fishmonger, fatten up two enormous lobsters for a prized customer, Mr Trimbel.”
33
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“A young boy’s discovery of twelve wooden soldiers that once belonged to the Brontë children leads to an exciting adventure.”
34
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“When 8 year-old Max discovers a box of 12 wooden soldiers in Napoleonic uniforms, hidden in the attic of their new home, he is naturally delighted.”
35
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“But when a thief steals the two splendid lobsters, Mr. Petrusca is more upset than anyone can understand. ”
36
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“Through clever sleuthing, guesswork, and observation, Hazel discovers that Mr. Petrusca can’t read.”
37
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“She’s not as pretty as my calf, the cow said with a sniff but all the chicks were cheeping, please, we want to play with Miff!”
38
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″ They were once the property of the Bronte children, years and years ago. Their exploits have been well recorded in “History of the Young Men” (by Branwell Bronte) and their names and personalities established therein.”
39
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“Hazel promises not to tell anyone, and she finally solves the mystery without giving away Mr. Pertrusca’s secret.”
40
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“I wrestled with that shadow, but it wasn’t any fun, I tried my very hardest— all the same, my shadow won.”
41
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“Yubbazubbies, you are yummy, you are succulent and sweet, you are splendidly delicious, quite delectable to eat...”
42
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″..how I smack my lips with relish when you bump against my knees, then nuzzle up beside me, chirping, “Eat us if you please!”
43
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“Everybody knows the story of the Three Little Pigs. Or at least they think they do. But I’ll let you in on a little secret. Nobody knows the real story, because nobody has ever heard my side of the story.” That’s Alexander T. Wolf talking, and he’d like to set the record straight. He says, “I don’t know how this whole Big Bad Wolf thing got started, but it’s all wrong . . . The real story is about a sneeze and a cup of sugar.”
44
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“I’m a basic boneless chicken, yes, I have no bones inside, I’m without a trace of rib cage, yet I hold myself with pride.”
45
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“The wooden soldiers stood exactly as he had seen them when Jane interrupted. They had not moved a tenth of an inch. They were as dead as ninepins. They had frozen again. Max sighed, enraged. ”
46
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“You are juicy, Yubbazubbies, you are tender, never tough, you are appetizing morsels, I can never get enough.”
47
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“you have captivating flavors and a tantalizing smell, a bit like candied apple, and a bit like caramel.”
48
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Prelutsky really uses his imagination writing about things we’ve thought about and things we’d never even imagined. The poems open readers up to the world and minds of children.
49
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“I am absolutely boneless, I am boneless through and through, I have neither neck nor thighbones, and my back is boneless too, and I haven’t got a wishbone, not a bone within my breast, so I rarely care to travel from the comfort of my nest.”
50
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“Jellyfish stew, I’m loony for you, I dearly adore you, oh, truly I do, you’re creepy to see, revolting to chew, you slide down inside, with a hullabaloo.”
51
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“I’m the wolf. Alexander T. Wolf. You can call me Al. I don’t know how this whole Big Bad Wolf thing got started, but it’s all wrong. ”
52
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“So I went to the the next house, and this guy was the first and second pig’s brother. He must have been the brains of the family, because he had built his house out of bricks.”
53
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“And I sneezed a great sneeze. And you know what? That whole darn straw house fell down. And right in the middle of the pile of straw was the First Little Pig- dead as doornail. He had been home the whole time. I seemed like a shame to leave a perfectly good ham dinner lying there in the straw. So I ate it up. Think of it as a big cheeseburger just lying there.”
54
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“Max has a secret. An incredible, mysterious, overwhelming secret. When he discovered a cache of old wooden soldiers in his family’s new attic, he thought they were fun and all but nothing particularly special.
55
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“His eyes were wide open, his eye-brows high up, and one cheek was swollen into a great bulge by the candy. He looked like a deformed, surprised dwarf. Of course they would say it was rats.”
56
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“Mrs Bunny cooked the meals, the house was clean and warm she went out shopping every day, her basket on her arm.”
57
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“But like I was saying, the whole Big Bad Wolf thing is all wrong. The real story is bout a sneeze and a cup of sugar. ”
58
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“Animals and birds inhabit this tale of extraordinary courage, told by one of Indias best childrens writers.”
59
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“One winter’s night it was so cold it began to snow. Great big snowflakes fell past the window...
60
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The Bed and Breakfast Star is a great book about a small girl, Elsa who lives with her mum, stepfather and her two step-siblings. She lives a normal life until one day they get homeless and are forced to live in a Bed and breakfast hotel. This hotel is disgusting and very small. Will Elsa and her family have better times or suffer to live their life?
61
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“Suddenly Percy hears a knock again. “Oh dear! Now there is someone else at the door!”. He goes to the door and looks out. It’s a fox. “It’s too cold outside. May I come in?” Percy replies: “well if you promise to behave.”- “I promise” says the fox and so it can come in and it goes into Percy’s bed. It’s warm now.”
62
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“It ‘s cold in the park in winter. But Percy the park keeper doesn’t mind. He puts on his warm coat and his big scarf and wears two pairs of woolly socks inside his wellington boots. Percy likes to be out in the fresh air.”
63
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″ So Henry showed Amy how to dress funny and roll down hills sideways. Together, they could be serious or silly, right-way-round or upside down. As long as they were together they could do anything! Any child who has ever experienced a moment of self-doubt will be both reassured and delighted by this heartwarming tale of two very different friends and their ability to help one another feel more complete.”
64
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“As usual, Cut-throat Jake is determined to give the Captain as much grief as possible, and he has a dastardly plot up his sleeve.”
65
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“Non, non!′ answered the Frenchman, greedily catching the bag of gold which Jake tossed over to him. ‘You are too kind, Captain Cut-throat!’ ‘Ho-ho-ho-ho! Kindness is my second name.”
66
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“Jolly Captain Pugwash is delighted at the prospect of earning 500 golden crowns for smuggling barrels of brandy across the English Channel. But little does he suspect what’s really inside the barrels!”
67
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“Meanwhile, in the hold, things were far from ship-shape! ‘Open up, all of ‘ee,’ whispered Cut-throat Jake, and one by one the lid of each brandy barrel opened to reveal a member of Jake’s gang inside.”
68
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“I could still imagine Thowra eluding capture because of the lessons Bel Bel had taught him.”
69
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“Now for cooking the supper,′ said Mrs. Pepperpot; ‘my husband will be back in an hour and, by hook or by crook, thirty pancakes must be ready on the table.’ She had mixed the dough for the pancakes in a bowl the day before.”
70
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“There were lots of pans in the shop, but I said: ‘If I can’t have that pan hanging right over the shop assistant’s head, I won’t buy any pan at all. For that is the best pan in the whole world, and I’m sure if I were ever in trouble that pan could jump on to the stove by itself.”
71
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“Trees are very nice. They will up the sky. They go beside the rivers and down the valleys. They live up on the hills.”
72
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“A tree is nice because it has leaves. The leaves whisper in the breeze all summer long.”
73
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“But all her young master wants to do is tease her—and he isn’t very good at remembering mealtime either. ”
74
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“A group of ten kids in Paris shares the joy of riding downhill on a toy they call the horse. And then some sketchy men steal the horse. ”
75
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“At the rhyme’s crashing finale--in which a boy delivers breakfast-in-bed to his parents... on a skateboard--Cole reminds children and adults that even the best of intentions sometimes result in an unmannerly mess: ”“I really tried!”
76
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“That the little unicorn is a baby goat, crippled, sick and too quiet a playmate, means nothing to Joe or to his good friend, Mr. Kandinsky.”
77
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“A little boy was sitting in the corner of a railway carriage looking out at the rain, which was splashing against the windows and blotching downward in an ugly, dirty way. He was not the only person in the carriage, but the others were strangers to him.”
78
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“The new store has a delivery service so Mr Potter employs an old little horse bus to deliver his wares.”
79
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“His good friend, Mr. Kandinsky, who makes trousers and who wants a mechanical steam presser to insure business, for the old man knows the importance of make-believe.”
80
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“The story has a lot of discussion points for young children about teasing and cruelty, about taking care of your animal friends.”
81
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“Opening night is full of surprises, though, and Foxie is overjoyed when she hears a familiar voice in the audience, calling out her name.”
82
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“One day his pranks go too far when he lures his dog out onto the busy city streets with a tasty bone and loses her.”
83
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“She ends up in the circus and while there she reunites with her young master who promises to treat her better! ”
84
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“Away went Edward to get some coaches. ‘Be careful, Edward,’ said the coaches, ‘don’t bump and bang us like the other engines do. So Edward came up to the coaches very, very gently, and the shunter fastened the coupling.”
85
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“Please let me be. Please go away. I am not going to get up today.”
86
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“The alarm can ring. The birds can peep. My bed is warm. My pillow’s deep. Today’s the day I’m going to sleep.”
87
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“Then he would stop and the silly freight cars would go bump into each other. “oh! Oh! Oh! Oh! they cried again. Edward pushed them until they were running nicely, and when they weren’t expecting it, he would stop.”
88
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“You won’t get me up with a Strawberry Flip. You won’t get me up with a Marshmallow Dip or a Pineapple Butterscotch Ding Dang Doo! My tongue is asleep. And my teeth are too.”
89
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“One day however, Hiznobyuti ended up getting a message from the stars that he is needed elsewhere.”
90
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‘I don’t care if kids are getting up right now all over town. I’m the kid who ISN’T getting up. I’m staying down.”
91
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“I’ve never been so sleepy since I can’t remember when. You can away my breakfast. Give my egg back to the hen. Nobody’s going to get. me up, no matter what he does.”
92
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“Would you put a skateboard on the stairs? Or leave the water running until the tub overflows so you can go snorkeling around the bathroom? Of course not!”
93
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“Do try to dress yourself correctly. Do put your right shoes on your feet.”
94
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“I really tried. You might not always get it right, but we all have to try in order to more forwards, learn and develop.”
95
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“Ernest, a bear, and Celestine, a mouse, lose Celestine’s stuffed bird in the snow.”
96
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“The Bear went over the mountains, the Bear went over the mountain, the Bear went over the mountain To see what he could see.”
97
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“But that is all right, because there is always something just as exciting to try next! ”
98
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“But that is all right, because there is always something just as exciting to try next. As winter arrives, the bear goes home to his cave, tired after his adventures. The Bear Went Over the Mountain teaches children about the five senses and the four seasons, all through a timeless song.”
99
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“Ultimately they decide to resume their original forms, but they never lose the empathy they have gained from their adventures.”
100
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“When the bear finds something unpleasant, like a smelly skunk or a prickly porcupine, he learns that the five senses have both good and bad traits.”
101
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“The fish longs for wings and the bird longs for fins. They decide to trade. It is great fun to experience their lives in a new way.”
102
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“The Hare hopped over the mountain, to see where Bear could be. On the other side of the mountain, she helped to set Bear free.”
103
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“They shrink to fight strep germs in their friend’s throat.”
104
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“It turns out to be magic, of course, and they have silly adventures.”
105
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“Two young friends are given a detached handset from a phone as a gift for helping a strange old gentleman find his glasses. It turns out to be magic, of course, and they have silly adventures.”
106
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“And Grandad Abdulla will say, ‘A balloon! A balloon for me! My grandson Sam must have sent it to show that, although he’s so far away, he’s thinking of me.’ ”
107
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“Angela Trogmorton lived alone and liked it that way. One day, while doing some light dusting, she heard a knock at the door.”
108
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“But Old Tom loved bath time most of all, when he could splash about and make a mess. He always liked to look his best.. especially when he went out to play.”
109
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“Winnie can’t find her cat Wilbur in her house, because both her house and Wilbur are black. So she uses magic to turn Wilbur into a variety of colours, each one of which leads to a variety of mishaps and makes Wilbur miserable. In the end, Winnie turns Wilbur back to his original color and changes the color of her house instead. ”
110
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“After sitting on him and tripping over him, Winnie turns Wilbur into a green cat. But then, he goes out into the grass. Winnie is going to need magic to make sure she can always see Wilbur.”
111
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“And so The Little Captain sets sail once more, this time with three of the town’s children, Podgy, Marinka and Thomas, as his crew mates.”
112
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“She had progressed no further when a scratching sound caused her to look down. A red ringleted head was rising toward her. ”
113
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“With a few brushstrokes and scribbles of ink, Blake conveys moods, contrasts economic situations, and praises those who appreciate secondhand items,”
114
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Master illustrator Quentin Blake has created an irrepressible character, and action-filled plot, and an eloquent story that can be read on several levels -- all without the use of a single word.
115
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But thanks to some hungry animals she meets along the way it’s Handa who’s in for a surprise!
116
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“Will she like the soft yellow banana or the sweet smelling guava? Will se like the round juicy orange... or the rip red mango?”
117
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At which point a goat bumps into a tree and a bunch of tangerines fall into Handa’s basket. Much to Handa’s Surprise Tangerines are Akeyo’s favourite fruit.
118
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Handa put seven delicious fruits in a basket for her friend, Akeyo.
119
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But along the way Handa gets lots of different animals taking the fruit from her basket.
120
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“She will be surprised, thought Handa as she set for Akeyo’s village.”
121
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Handa puts fruit in a basket, underway she looses the fruit unnoticed. What a cute little funny story with beautiful, colorful drawings! It might be a simple story, but I really enjoyed. Great for kids and grownups!
122
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Unaware that various animals have taken these tropical fruits, Handa continues along her journey, at which point a goat bumps into a tree and a bunch of tangerines fall into Handa’s basket.
123
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One morning, almost as if in a dream, Billy wakes up to find that he has turned into a girl!
124
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Wolfy teaches Tom to run really, really fast enabling him to run much faster than the other rabbits. Wolfy teaches his friend about being afraid.
125
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One day Wolfy frightens Tom so badly while playing the game that the scared little rabbit rushes to his burrow and vows to never come out again.
126
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Wolfy is totally devastated. What in the world has he done to his very best friend?
127
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The vibrantly coloured and expressive illustrations and best of all the feelings of love, compassion and empathy that flow throughout the story.
128
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The wolf’s uncle dies before teaching him how to hunt. Since Wolfy has never even seen a rabbit, he doesn’t realize that the two species are natural enemies.
129
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When Alexander becomes lost in the city, his stuffed dog Felix comes to rescue him, only to become lost himself.
130
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Several of the children befriend an elderly person who, despite the contrariness seemingly endemic to old age, is able to offer up many of the things the children are missing in their lives.
131
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‘Badger on the Barge’ – this story had depth and originality. Helen was a practical child whose narrative voice interestingly explored grief in a close-knit family.
132
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Alexander, who can’t have pets in his city apartment, has Felix, a stuffed dog, with whom he talks and laughs. One day Alex fails to return at the expected time, and Felix goes out in search of his owner, accidentally ripping his side on the way.
133
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“Every afternoon Alexander would go for a walk in the city streets near his block of flats. He couldn’t take Felix because he was too small. Felix would sit up at the window, waiting for Alexander to return.”
134
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“Felix had to find Alexander. He packed his torch into his suitcase and went out to look for Alexander. Felix climbed out of window, edged across to the drainpipe and slid down in to the garden.”
135
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“Please, don’t touch anything,′ says Grandpa. ‘Don’t touch,’ says Dusty, as he presses a switch in the mixer. The beater and the bowl begin whirling around. Flour flies all over. Grandpa shouts, ‘No, no, NO!”
136
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“Whatever can that be?′ said Little Spook. Very slowly Little Spook pushed open the door and they peeped round. But inside the room there were only Mother and Father spook”
137
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Little Spook and the little Prince were playing together when they heard a terrible noise. They went to find Little Spook’s parents who revealed that the noise came from Little Spook’s brand-new baby sister. And that sister can make some noises!
138
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“Little Spook was a friendly ghost. He lived in Morning Sun Castle and his best friend was the little Prince. They played together all day long.”
139
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“There’s not such thing as an afraid albatross,” said the albatross. “The ocean wouldn’t bed the ocean without storms. And the ocean is where I live. How can you get lost when you’re were you live? I was born on a rock in the middle of the ocean, and Wandering is my name.”
140
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“Father Spook was sitting in a chair with his eyes closed and cotton wool on his ears, ‘Perhaps Daddy has carache,’ Little Spook` whispered to his friend. Then Mother Spook saw them. She gave each boy a big hug. ‘Come over here,’ she said. ‘I have something to show you.”
141
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“He ran back to the beach and up to the big old seaweed-bearded rocks. Then he ran up and down the beach and gathered together all his sea-stones and sea-glass and sea-china.”
142
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“In the evening Little Spook and the little Princes went down the steep steps to the cellar, to say hello to Little Spook’s father and mother. One evening, on the way down to the cellar, Little Spook and the Prince heard a very strange noise.”
143
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“We were soon down in the village and went clattering down the village street on our horses. It wasn’t difficult to find out way because we could hear laughter and talk from a long way away. ”
144
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The day they were sent home early from school because of a threatening blizzard, Amy rode with the other pupils in Mrs. Rhys’s van to where the road ended.
145
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“For Days the General and his men had been marching. Now they were all round the town and ready to fight. The General called his Gunner. ‘Is the gun in place? ’ he said.”
146
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‘You mean the duck’s right in there?’ said the General. ‘Yes, sir, ’ said the Gunner. ‘I put my hand in but I couldn’t reach it.’ The General looked down the gun and saw two small eyes looking back at him.”
147
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‘There is something you can do, sir,’ said one of the men. ‘You can fire it with the duck inside.’ ‘No, no, no,’ said the General. ‘We’ll think of something else. I know, we’ll borrow a gun.”
148
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“The guards led him through the streets to the Prime Minister’s house. The General knocked on the door and at once it was opened by the Prime Minister’s daughter.”
149
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“A classic Australian story of the bond a boy and a pelican. Beautiful descriptions of the landscape and people are a real treat.”
150
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“It is a fast-paced, exciting, children’s book about how World War 2 was in Holland. Many exciting adventures happen to two young brothers in this trilling book for kids.”
151
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“It seems like the Nazis have always occupied Holland, but now they’re tightening their hold and confiscating more.”
152
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“Both wonderfully timeless and quirky, this unconventional adventure will delight its audience and belongs in most collections.”
153
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“Morning Ivor, jumping cold this morning!′ Then Jones would light up Ivor’s boiler, fill his coal box, and when the boiler had begun to boil, Jones would make a pot of tea from the boiler tap, and he would sit on the step of the engine and drink his cup.”
154
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“The little houses, all huddled together in the village, with the smoke coming straight up out of the chimneys, the sheep on the hills, and far away, bright in the morning sun, he could see the sea.”
155
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″ He was sent to the butcher’s as payment for a bill. It was devastating to her and also to me. ”
156
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“He likes to hear the sounds it makes.”
157
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“Little Brown Bear likes to take a bath. The water feels warm and good. He likes to play with toy animals in the water.”
158
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“Little Brown Bear pours the water from the bottle.”
159
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“The soldiers stopped first at the house of Paul and Francoise. ‘Good evening to you,’ they said. ‘Could you spare a bit of food for three hungry soldiers?”
160
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“Treated badly by the cruel first mate, he decides to jump ship when they arrive. The locals all decide to help him out.”
161
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“Three soldiers trudged down a road in a strange country. There were on their way home from the wars. Besides being tired, there were hungry. In fact, they had eaten nothing for two days.”
162
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“He heard about the time Tashi met a little woman as small as a cricket, and she told him the future.”
163
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“And the pig answered, ‘Not by the hair of chinny-chin-chin.’ the wolf said, ‘Then I’ll huff and I’ll puff and I’ll blow your house in!”
164
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“They met on a beach. Stony, a gloomy rabbit who is terrified of being lost, has been lost by his aunt and uncle.”
165
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″..and Crystal-Voice and Fleur always hiding, so they won’t be found.”
166
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″--building a home, hunting for food, singing songs, and writing poems.”
167
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“Then disaster strikes, taking Crystal-Voice and Fleur away from Stony. ”
168
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“Lotta decides to act on her own. But that’s when she discovers that not all bicycles, stolen or otherwise, are equally easy to ride!”
169
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″ But she’s just turned five, after all! And it is her birthday, and she does appreciate all her other presents.”

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