concept

parenting Quotes

81 of the best book quotes about parenting
  1. #1
    “He turned out the light and went into Jem’s room. He would be there all night, and he would be there when Jem waked up in the morning.”
  2. #2
    “Raising children who are hopeful and who have the courage to be vulnerable means stepping back and letting them experience disappointment, deal with conflict, learn how to assert themselves, and have the opportunity to fail. If we’re always following our children into the arena, hushing the critics, and assuring their victory, they’ll never learn that they have the ability to dare greatly on their own.”
  3. #3
    “The real questions for parents should be: ‘Are you engaged? Are you paying attention?’ If so, plan to make lots of mistakes and bad decisions. Imperfect parenting moments turn into gifts as our children watch us try to figure out what went wrong and how we can do better next time. The mandate is not to be perfect and raise happy children. Perfection doesn’t exist, and I’ve found what makes children happy doesn’t always prepare them to be courageous, engaged adults.”
  4. #4
    “…In its original Latin form, sacrifice means to make sacred or to make holy. I wholeheartedly believe that when we are fully engaged in parenting, regardless of how imperfect, vulnerable, and messy it is, we are creating something sacred.”
  5. #5
    “Who we are and how we engage with the world are much stronger predictors of how our children will do than what we know about parenting.”
  6. #6
    “Children aren’t coloring books. You don’t get to fill them with your favorite colors.”
  7. #7
    ″Fashion, by the way, is commerce masquerading as hip. I’m not at all interested in fashion, which is why I rarely buy new clothes. The fact that fashion goes out of fashion and then comes back into fashion based solely on what a few people somewhere think they can sell, well to me,that’s insanity.My parents taught me: You buy new clothes when your old clothes wear out. Anyone who saw what I wore to my last lecture knows this is advice I live by! ″
  8. #8
    “To a parent, your child wasn’t just a person: your child was a place, a kind of Narnia, a vast eternal place where the present you were living and the past you remembered and the future you longed for all at the same time.”
  9. #9
    “Parents don’t leave Children alone, James, they raise them.”
  10. #10
    “To produce a happy child, as a parent, a teacher, a friend, or a society, is to successfully fulfill a divine function.”
  1. #11
    “Years later, shortly after his daughter was born, Henry called our house one night in tears. ‘I get it now,’ he told Dad.”
  2. #12
    “Is she the only one at fault? For though she’s spoiled, and dreadfully so, A girl can’t spoil herself, you know. Who spoiled her, then? Ah, who indeed? Who pandered to her every need? Who turned her into such a brat? Who are the culprits? Who did that? Alas! You needn’t look so far To find out who these sinners are. They are (and this is very sad) Her loving parents, MUM and DAD. And that is why we’re glad they fell Into the garbage chute as well.”
  3. #13
    “Mother says as th’ two worst things as can happen to a child is never to have his own way—or always to have it. She doesn’t know which is th’ worst.”
  4. #14
    “All I know is, the violence rose from the fear like smoke from a fire.”
  5. #15
    “Perhaps it takes courage to raise children.”
  6. #16
    “What if, in raising children, we focus on ability instead of gender? What if we focus on interest instead of gender?”
  7. #17
    “To have a child is the greatest honor and responsibility that can be bestowed upon any living being.”
  8. #18
    “Florence saw childhood as something fleeting to be enjoyed. I saw childhood as a training period, a time to build character and invest for the future.”
  9. #19
    “Chinese parents believe that they know what is best for their children and therefore override all of their children’s own desires and preferences.”
  10. #20
    “By contrast, I can’t tell you how many Asian kids I’ve met who, while acknowledging how oppressively strict and brutally demanding their parents were, happily describe themselves as devoted to their parents and unbelievably grateful to them, seemingly without a trace of bitterness or resentment.”

Books about parenting

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Pokko and the Drum book
Picture book
5.9
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Go, Pea, Go! book
Picture book
5.9
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Jabari Jumps book
Picture book
5.8
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I Heart You book
Picture book
5.8
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Bear of My Heart book
Board book
5.8
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Just Because book
Picture book
5.6
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Little House in the Big Woods book
Chapter book
5.6
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Babymoon book
Picture book
5.5
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  1. #21
    “Happiness is not a concept I tend to dwell on. Chinese parenting does not address happiness.”
  2. #22
    “On the other hand, Florence was right. The kids were definitely mad at me. But as a Chinese mother, I put that out of my head.”
  3. #23
    “Chinese parenting is one of the most difficult things I can think of. You have to be hated sometimes by someone you love and who hopefully loves you, and there’s just no letting up, no point at which it suddenly becomes easy.”
  4. #24
    “I ain’t doing my duty by that boy, and that’s the Lord’s truth, goodness knows. Spare the rod and spile the child, as the Good Book says. I’m a-laying up sin and suffering for us both, I know. He’s full of the Old Scratch, but laws-a-me! he’s my own dead sister’s boy, poor thing, and I ain’t got the heart to lash him, somehow. Every time I let him off, my conscience does hurt me so, and every time I hit him my old heart most breaks.”
  5. #25
    “Maybe they’re right,” Ammu’s whisper said. “Maybe a boy does need a Baba.”
  6. #26
    “A huge majority of parents use some form of physical or verbal aggression against children. Since women remain the primary caretakers of children, the facts confirm the reality that given a hierarchal system in a culture of domination which empowers females (like the parent-child relationship) all too often they use coercive force to maintain dominance.”
  7. #27
    “The recipe for fun is pretty simple raising boys: add to any activity an element of danger, stir in a little exploration, add a dash of destruction, and you’ve got yourself a winner.”
  8. #28
    “I used to believe my father about everything but then I had children myself & now I see how much stuff you make up just to keep yourself from going crazy.”
  9. #29
    “When I was 5, he said, my family forgot & left me at the fair. I wandered around in the bright sounds & smells of hot sawdust & cotton candy for hours. It was already too late by the time my parents found me.
    I haven’t been fit for decent society since.”
  10. #30
    “Am I scared of the horrible things I know will happen to my kid to hurt him? Absolutely. But would I stop those things at the risk of taking away joy and growth and the absolute embracing of life? Never. Because I love this child for being mine, but I also love him for being who he will be, and I can’t tell you how excited I am to watch him discover that for himself.”
  1. #31
    “The degree to which a surviving parent copes is the most important indicator of the child’s long-term adaptation. Kids whose surviving parents are unable to function effectively in the parenting role show more anxiety and depression, as well as sleep and health problems, than those whose parents have a strong support network and solid inner resources to rely on.”
  2. #32
    “There is an important principle that guides our thinking about the relationship between parenting and money - and that principle is that more is not always better.”
  3. #33
    “Children, I confess, are not born in this full state of equality, though they are born to it. Their parents have a sort of rule and jurisdiction over them, when they come into the world, and for some time after; but it is but a temporary one.”
  4. #34
    “Shall we just carelessly allow children to hear any casual tales which may be devised by casual persons, and to receive into their minds ideas for the most part the very opposite of those which we should wish them to have when they are grown up?”
  5. #35
    ″‘I wanted my children to have the best combination: American circumstances and Chinese character. How could I know these things do not mix?‘”
  6. #36
    “I hope and pray that all you parents in the sound of my voice will train up your children in the way they should go.”
  7. #37
    “She had witnessed firsthand the scars that blatant parental interference could inflict; why, even those assembled here were a reminder of that —Daisy’s relationship with her sons was tenuous at best, while Lorena’s eldest daughter no longer spoke to her after immigrating to Auckland with her Kiwi husband.”
  8. #38
    “They [parents] can resist the impulse to ‘prove’ their love by showering children with things they do not need and give them precious time and attention instead.”
  9. #39
    “First, we parents have to back up school authority and quit making excuses for our kids when they misbehave.”
  10. #40
    “They’ll have a lot of troubles, I suppose, but that’s none of our business. Everybody has a right to their own troubles.”

Books about love

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More Than Balloons book
Board book
6.2
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The Rag Coat book
Picture book
6.1
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Three Little Words book
Picture book
6.0
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All the Places to Love book
Picture book
6.0
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Spot Loves His Daddy book
Board book
6.0
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The Trumpet of the Swan book
Chapter book
6.0
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Penguin and Pinecone book
Board book
6.0
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Charlotte and the Rock book
Picture book
5.9
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  1. #41
    “When infants aren’t held, they can become sick, even die. It’s universally accepted that children need love, but at what age are people supposed to stop needing it? We never do. We need love in order to live happily, as much as we need oxygen in order to live at all.”
  2. #42
    “The father’s job is to teach his children how to be warriors, to give them the confidence to get on the horse to ride into battle when it’s necessary to do so. If you don’t get that from your father, you have to teach yourself.”
  3. #43
    “All parents damage their children. It cannot be helped. Youth, like pristine glass, absorbs the prints of its handlers. Some parents smudge, others crack, a few shatter childhoods completely into jagged little pieces, beyond repair.”
  4. #44
    “Parents are like God because you wanna know they’re out there, and you want them to think well of you, but you really only call when you need something.”
  5. #45
    “Before Jem looks at anyone else he looks at me, and I’ve tried to live so I can look squarely back at him.”
  6. #46
    “Then her conscience reproached her, and she yearned to say something kind and loving; but she judged that this would be construed into a confession that she had been in the wrong, and discipline forbade that. So she kept silence, and went about her affairs with a troubled heart.”
  7. #47
    “The innocent and helpless creature bestowed on them by heaven, whom to bring up to good, and whose future lot it was in their hands to direct to happiness or misery, according as they fulfilled their duties towards me.”
    author
    Mary Shelley
    person
    Parents
    book
    Frankenstein
    character
    Victor
    concept
    parenting
  8. #48
    “It occurred to me that the reason my parents had no money was me. I’d sapped the family savings with Phalanxifor copays, and Mom couldn’t work because she had taken on the full-time profession of Hovering Over Me.”
  9. #49
    “That’s the thing about being the product of happily married parents. You grow up thinking the fairy tale is real, and more than that, you think you’re entitled to live it.”
  10. #50
    “Western parents try to respect their children’s individuality, encouraging them to pursue their true passions, supporting their choices, and providing positive reinforcement and a nurturing environment. By contrast, the Chinese believe that the best way to protect their children is by preparing them for the future, letting them see what they’re capable of, and arming them with skills, work habits, and inner confidence that no one can ever take away.”
  1. #51
    “All decent parents want to do what’s best for their children. The Chinese just have a totally different idea of how to do that.”
  2. #52
    “Chinese parents believe that their kids owe them everything.”
  3. #53
    “For Chinese people, when it comes to parents, nothing is negotiable.”
  4. #54
    “If you want the experience of having complete responsibility for another human being, and to learn how to love and bond in the deepest way, then you should have children.”
  5. #55
    “In the end, a parent’s responsibility could not be more simple: To bring a child safely into adulthood so that she could have a chance to experience a life of purpose and, God willing, contentment.”
  6. #56
    “You love your child for who the child is, not as an extension of your identity or as an example of your good parenting or even as a companion.”
  7. #57
    “Part of being a good parent was knowing when to say something and what to say. The HARDEST part of parenting was knowing when to say nothing and listen.”
  8. #58
    “It still remains unrecognised, that to bring a child into existence without a fair prospect of being able, not only to provide food for its body, but instruction and training for its mind, is a moral crime, both against the unfortunate offspring and against society;”
  9. #59
    “Standing ten yards away is Connor’s father, still holding the cell phone he had just called from.”
  10. #60
    “I pointed out that so often our parenting in the West is too focused on our children, and their needs alone, rather than helping them to learn to care for others.”
  1. #61
    “I never married—but, I think, I know
    That sons should not be educated so”
  2. #62
    “Children who are not encouraged to do, to try, to explore, to master, and to risk failure, often feel helpless and inadequate. Over-controlled by anxious, fearful parents, these children often become anxious and fearful themselves. This makes it difficult for them to mature. Many never outgrow the need for ongoing parental guidance and control. As a result, their parents continue to invade, manipulate, and frequently dominate their lives.”
  3. #63
    “They came to understand love as something chaotic, dramatic, confusing, and often painful—something they had to give up their own dreams and desires for. Obviously, that’s not what love is all about. Loving behaviour doesn’t grind you down, keep you off balance, or create feelings of self-hatred. Love doesn’t hurt, it feels good.”
  4. #64
    “Perfectionist parents seem to operate under the illusion that if they can just get their children to be perfect, they will be a perfect family. They put the burden of stability on the child to avoid facing the fact that they, as parents, cannot provide it. The child fails and becomes the scapegoat for family problems. Once again, the child is saddled with the blame.”
  5. #65
    “Most adult children of toxic parents grow up feeling tremendous confusion about what love means and how it’s supposed to feel. ”
  6. #66
    “Unhealthy families discourage individual expression. Everyone must conform to the thoughts and actions of the toxic parents. ”
  7. #67
    “Many toxic parents compare one sibling unfavorably with another to make the target child feel that he’s not doing enough to gain parental affection. This motivates the child to do whatever the parents want in order to regain their favor. This divide-and-conquer technique is often unleashed against children who become a little too independent, threatening the balance of the family system.”
  8. #68
    “Loving behaviour nourishes your emotional well-being. When someone is being loving to you, you feel accepted, cared for, valued, and respected. Genuine love creates feelings of warmth, pleasure, safety, stability, and inner peace.”
  9. #69
    “Denial is the lid on our emotional pressure cooker: the longer we leave it on, the more pressure we build up. Sooner or later, that pressure is bound to pop the lid, and we have an emotional crisis.”
  10. #70
    “Phil talked openly about his current life, but he closed up when I asked him about his early years. With some gentle probing, he told me that what he remembered most vividly about his childhood was his father’s constant teasing. The jokes were always at Phil’s expense and he often felt humiliated.”
  1. #71
    “My father never did any of the things that my friends’ fathers did with them. We never tossed a football around or even watched games together. He would always say, ‘I don’t have time—maybe later,; but he always had time to sit around and get drunk.”
  2. #72
    “It was bad enough being teased, but sometimes he really scared me when he’d say things like: ‘This boy can’t be a son of ours, look at that face. I’ll bet they switched babies on us in the hospital. Why don’t we take him back and swap him for the right one.’ I was only six, and I really thought I was going to get dropped off at the hospital. ”
  3. #73
    “We can only speculate why, but physically abusive parents seem to share certain characteristics. First, they have an appalling lack of impulse control.”
  4. #74
    “Positive humor is one of our most valuable tools for strengthening family bonds. But humor that belittles can be extremely damaging within the family. Children take sarcasm and humorous exaggeration at face value.”
  5. #75
    “We have all been guilty of making jokes at someone else’s expense. Most of the time, such jokes can be relatively harmless. But, as in other forms of toxic parenting, it is the frequency, the cruelty, and the source of these jokes that make them abusive.”
  6. #76
    “Then, like a levee breaking, it all came out: “I took advantage of her. I manipulated her. I called her horrible things. I stole her car once, with a shoelace. I’d leave, for days at a time, without telling her where I’d gone or who I was out with. I must have given her ulcers. When I . . . when I left for college, we didn’t even say goodbye. I just got in my Honda and drove to Boulder. I stole a bottle of her gin from the cabinet on my way out.”
  7. #77
    “Children believe and internalize what their parents say about them. It is sadistic and destructive for a parent to make repetitive jokes at the expense of a vulnerable child. Phil was constantly being humiliated and picked on.”
  8. #78
    “Much of a child’s identity and his illusions of safety depend on feeling enmeshed. He develops a need to be a part of other people and to have them be a part of him. He can’t stand the thought of being cast out. This need for enmeshment carries right into adult relationships.”
  9. #79
    “You can learn, but you’ve got to give yourself time to pick up the basics, to practice, and maybe even to fail once or twice.”
  10. #80
    “Instead of promoting healthy development, they unconsciously undermine it, often with the belief that they are acting in their child’s best interest.”
  11. #81
    “The most important thing anyone can do is raise their kids well.”
Book Topics › childhood
Children's Books About Childhood
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Children's Books About Responsibility
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Children's Books About Learning
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