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kings Quotes

43 of the best book quotes about kings
  1. #1
    Gil-galad was an Elven-king.
    Of him the harpers sadly sing:
    The last whose realm was fair and free
    Between the Mountains and the Sea.
    His sword was long, his lance was keen,
    His shining helm afar was seen;
    The countless stars of heaven’s field
    Were mirrored in his silver shield.
    But long ago he rode away,
    And where he dwelleth none can say;
    For into darkness fell his star
    In Mordor where the shadows are.
  2. #2
    “Cacambo asked one of the great officers in what way he should pay his obeisance to his Majesty; whether they should throw themselves upon their knees or on their stomachs; whether they should put their hands upon their heads or behind their backs; whether they should lick the dust off the floor; in a word, what was the ceremony?
    ‘The custom,” said the great officer, ‘is to embrace the King, and to kiss him on each cheek.’”
  3. #3
    “He coulda been a king.”
  4. #4
    “Don’t be a pawn, when you’re meant to be the king.”
  5. #5
    “He called them privately after the Kings and Queens of England; Cam the Wicked, James the Ruthless, Andrew the Just, Prue the Fair—for Prue would have beauty, he thought, how could she help it?—and Andrew brains.”
  6. #6
    “Whoso pulleth Out This Sword of This Stone and Anvil, is Rightwise King Born of All England.”
  7. #7
    “He could not tell whether the queen meant light-haired or light-heired; for why might she not aspirate her vowels when she was ex-asperated herself?”
  8. #8
    “Not for some far-off kinsman, but myself, Shall I expel this poison in the blood; For whoso slew that king might have a mind To strike me too with his assassin hand.”
  9. #9
    “Thou art the man, Thou the accursed polluter of this land.”
  10. #10
    “In a room sit three great men, a king, a priest, and a rich man with his gold. Between them stands a sellsword, a little man of common birth and no great mind. Each of the great ones bids him slay the other two. ‘Do it,’ says the king, ‘for I am your lawful ruler.’ ‘Do it,’ says the priest, ‘for I command you in the names of the gods.’ ‘Do it,’ says the rich man, ‘and all this gold shall be yours.’ So tell me—who lives and who dies?”
  1. #11
    “It was Leslie who had taken him from the cow pasture into Terabithia and turned him into a king. He had thought that was it. Wasn’t king the best you could be? Now it occurred to him that perhaps Terabithia was like a castle where you came to be knighted. After you stayed for a while and grew strong you had to move on.”
  2. #12
    “From my vantage point, hidden behind the flowers, I’m level with the king’s box and slightly behind it. Mare Barrow, a few yards from the king. What would my family think, or Kilorn for that matter? This man sends us to die, and I’ve willingly become his servant. It makes me sick.”
  3. #13
    “One can ignore a poor shirtless wretch doing such labor, but none ignore a king sharing the load. Perhaps we should switch places more often. If a king is seen to assume the burden of the poorest of men, perhaps there will be those who will help him with his own load, so invisible, yet so daunting.”
  4. #14
    “I think the king is but a man, as I am: the violet smells to him as it doth to me.”
  5. #15
    “Not today, O Lord,
    O, not today, think not upon the fault
    My father made in compassing the crown.
    I Richard’s body have interrèd new
    And on it have bestowed more contrite tears
    Than from it issued forcèd drops of blood.
    Five hundred poor I have in yearly pay
    Who twice a day their withered hands hold up
    Toward heaven, to pardon blood.”
  6. #16
    “So, if a son that is by his father sent about
    merchandise do sinfully miscarry upon the sea,
    the imputation of his wickedness, by your rule,
    should be imposed upon his father that sent him.”
  7. #17
    “Upon the king! Let us our lives, our souls, our
    debts, our careful wives, our children, and our sins
    lay on the King!
    We must bear all. O hard condition,
    Twin-born with greatness, subject to the breath
    Of every fool, whose sense no more can feel
    But his own wringing.”
  8. #18
    “Every subject’s duty is the king’s, but every subject’s soul is his own.”
  9. #19
    “Yet, in reason, no man should possess him
    with any appearance of fear, lest he, by showing it,
    should dishearten his army.”
  10. #20
    “Duplicity of any sort is exceedingly objectionable between married people of any rank, not to say kings and queens; and the most objectionable form duplicity can assume is that of punning.”

Books by William Shakespeare

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  1. #21
    “All the queens of my acquaintance have children, some three, some seven, and some as many as twelve; and my queen has not one. I feel ill-used.”
  2. #22
    “There above How many now hold themselves mighty kings Who here like swine shall wallow in the mire, Leaving behind them horrible dispraise!”
  3. #23
    “Even as one did thy mother bear thee, she the wild cow of the cattle stalls, Ninsunna, whose head she exalted more than a husband. Royal power over the people Enlil has decreed for thee.”
  4. #24
    “Oh Enkidu, arise, I will conduct thee unto Eanna dwelling place of Anu, where Gilgamish [oppresses] the souls of men.”
  5. #25
    “Miraz weeded them out. Belisar and Uvilas were shot with arrows on a hunting party: by chance, it was pretended. All the great house of the Passarids he sent to fight giants on the northern frontier till one by one they fell.”
  6. #26
    “Why, if not, we should be as able to win it without the King’s grace as with him. For I need not tell your Lordship that Miraz is no very great captain. And after that, we should be both victorious and kingless.”
  7. #27
    “A certain king had a beautiful garden, and in the garden stood a tree which bore golden apples. These apples were always counted, and about the time when they began to grow ripe it was found that every night one of them was gone. The king became very angry at this, and ordered the gardener to keep watch all night under the tree. The gardener set his eldest son to watch; but about twelve o’clock he fell asleep, and in the morning another of the apples was missing.”
  8. #28
    “The king, who was the wisest man in the kingdom, knew well there was a time when things must be done and questions left till afterwards.”
  9. #29
    “The old king was very angry, and wanted to punish his wicked sons; but they made their escape , and got into a ship and sailed away over the wide sea, and where they went to nobody knew and nobody cared.”
  10. #30
    “All the kings of the earth before God are as grasshoppers; they are nothing, and less than nothing: both their love and their hatred is to be despised.”
  1. #31
    “Absolute monarchs are but men.”
  2. #32
    “When he opened the door, the light from within threw his shadow clear across the yard, and for just a moment Tyrion Lannister stood tall as a king.”
  3. #33
    “Lavender’s blue,
    Rosemary’s green,
    When you are king,
    I shall be queen”
  4. #34
    “You hardly know me, Johnny, so I beg you to believe my reputation: I’m a constant soldier and a sometime poet and I will be King.”
  5. #35
    “My, what a greedy little trinity you are: king, king, king. Two of you must learn to live with disappointment.”
  6. #36
    “I’ve snapped and plotted all my life. There’s no other way to be a king, alive and fifty all at the same time.”
  7. #37
    “My position is - well frankly, Philip, it’s a tangle. Once I’m dead, who’s to be king? I could draw papers ‘til my scribes drop or the ink runs out, and once I died, unless I’ve left behind me three contented sons, my lands will split three ways in civil war.”
  8. #38
    “You get Alais and you get the kingdom but I get the one thing I want most. If you’re king, England stays intact. I get that. It’s all yours now-the girl, the crown, the whole black bloody business. Isn’t that enough?”
  9. #39
    “I have not disobeyed my sovereign. I truly believe no man in England is safer than myself.”
  10. #40
    ″‘There is something more powerful than any army. Something strong enough to topple kings, and even Darklings. Do you know what that thing is?‘.... ‘Faith,’ he breathed, his black eyes wild. “Faith’”
  11. #41
    “A king does not abide within his tent while his men bleed and die upon the field. A king does not dine while his men go hungry, nor sleep when they stand at watch upon the wall. A king does not command his men’s loyalty through fear nor purchase it with gold; he earns their love by the sweat of his own back and the pains he endures for their sake.”
  12. #42
    “That which comprises the harshest burden, a king lifts first and sets down last. A king does not require service of those he leads but provides it to them...A king does not expend his substance to enslave men, but by his conduct and example makes them free.”
  13. #43
    “Technology has tended to devaluate the traditional vision-inducing materials. The illumination of a city, for example, was once a rare event, reserved for victories and national holidays, for the canonization of saints and the crowning of kings. Now it occurs nightly and celebrates the virtues of gin, cigarettes and toothpaste.”

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